Movilidad inteligente: Desarrollo de soluciones para la infraestructura urbana de América Latina

Movilidad inteligente: Desarrollo de soluciones para la infraestructura urbana de América Latina

¿Cómo te viniste al trabajo hoy? En muchas ciudades de América Latina, este trayecto, que realizamos diario, tarda más de una hora. En Sao Paulo, la gente, en promedio, necesita 63 minutos para llegar al trabajo. Para muchas personas que viven en grandes ciudades como Ciudad de México, Bogotá, Lima o Santiago, pasar dos valiosas horas para ir y volver a casa del trabajo no es algo extraño. En los últimos años, la cantidad de coches registrados en Ciudad de México duplica la cantidad de bebés recién nacidos. El transporte público y la infraestructura urbana no se han desarrollado al mismo ritmo que el crecimiento económico.

miércoles, 8 de abril de 2015/Author: David Bloomgarden/Number of views (12148)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating

Can Public Private Partnerships work in Haiti?

 

In Port-au-Prince on July 27, the MIF sponsored a seminar on public-private partnerships (PPPs) with officials from the Haitian Ministry of Finance and other government agencies. Based on our discussions with the government and other stakeholders in Haiti, we at the MIF believe that the private sector can and should play a major role in fostering economic growth and reducing poverty in Haiti. In areas as diverse as tourism, coffee and mango farming, and venture capital, the Haitian public and private sectors are already collaborating with the MIF to stimulate job creation and business growth. PPPs offer powerful models through which the private sector can engage in economic development in Haiti. 

 
Is Haiti ready and able to implement PPPs? 
martes, 14 de agosto de 2012/Author: David Bloomgarden/Number of views (8359)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating

A critical time to support infrastructure development

 


On June 26, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao concluded his tour of Latin America by offering a US$10 billion loan program for infrastructure projects in the region. A commitment of this size will undoubtedly have wide ranging benefits for productivity and growth, although when one compares the size of the pledge to the region’s estimated $200 to $250 billion infrastructure gap, it’s clear that even more needs to be done to meet peoples’ needs.  
 
One way to fill the gap is through public-private partnerships or “PPPs,” long-term contracts between a public-sector body and a private-sector entity for the design, construction operation and maintenance of public infrastructure.
martes, 10 de julio de 2012/Author: Dennis Blumenfeld/Number of views (9285)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating