Effective solutions for youth that don’t want to be NEET anymore.

By Francisco Larra Bujalance

Alejandra is a Mexican young woman whom dropped out of secondary school when she was 16 years old due to her pregnancy. After a long period out from school and the labor market, she would like to work but she perceives that her situation neither allows her to enroll in a job training nor look for a job. Daniel decided to drop out when he was studying his last year of secondary school. He thought that school didn’t contribute anything to his life and he decided, in his own words, “to the monotony of doing nothing for living” because there was not hope in Uraba, his home region in Colombia.    

Improving job opportunities for youth in Valparaiso

By Francisco Larra Bujalance

Chile has been one of the faster growing economies in the region during the last decade. However, like the rest of the Latin American and the Caribbean region, 50 percent of its businesses are struggling to hire qualified workers, especially for technical and operative positions. In parallel, 4.2 million youth, especially those in more disadvantaged situations, have unlocked potential and risk being excluded from economic grow.

Multi-stakeholder alliances: learning to see the world through the eyes of the others

By Francisco Larra Bujalance

Six blind Hindustani men set out to determine what an elephant looked like by feeling different parts of the animal’s body. The first man approached the elephant, and happening to fall against his broad side, at once called out, "The elephant is very much like a wall!" The second, feeling the tusk, cried, "What we have here is so very round and smooth and sharp that it is mighty clear the elephant is very like a spear!" The third happened to take the squirming trunk within his hands and said, "My God, the elephant is very much like a snake!" The fourth reached out an eager hand and felt the animal’s knee. He said, “It’s clear enough the elephant is very like a tree!" The fifth, who happened to touch the ear, said, "Even the blindest man can tell the fact that an elephant is very much like a fan!" The sixth seized on the swinging tail. "I see," he said, "the elephant is very much like a rope!" And so, these Hindustani men disputed loud and long, though each was partly in the right, and all were in the wrong. (This parable is attributed to Rumi, a 13th century Persian poet and teacher of Sufism.)

Multi-stakeholder alliances: learning to see the world through the eyes of the others

By Francisco Larra Bujalance

Seis hindúes sabios, inclinados al estudio, quisieron saber qué era un elefante. Como eran ciegos, decidieron hacerlo mediante el tacto. El primero en llegar junto al elefante, chocó contra su ancho y duro lomo y dijo: «Ya veo, es como una pared». El segundo, palpando el colmillo, gritó: «Esto es tan agudo, redondo y liso que el elefante es como una lanza». El tercero tocó la trompa retorcida y gritó: «¡Dios me libre! El elefante es como una serpiente». El cuarto extendió su mano hasta la rodilla, palpó en torno y dijo: «Está claro, el elefante es como un árbol». El quinto, que casualmente tocó una oreja, exclamó: «Aún el más ciego de los hombres se daría cuenta de que el elefante es como un abanico». El sexto, quien tocó la oscilante cola, acotó: «El elefante es muy parecido a una soga». Y así, los sabios discutieron largo y tendido, cada uno excesivamente terco y violento en su propia opinión y, aunque parcialmente en lo cierto, estaban todos equivocados. Parábola atribuida a Rumi, sufí persa del s. XIII.

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